This is a public service announcement from the CDC. Beware, Varsity Itis is going around and it will kill you.

hello and welcome to Tulsa tumble talk with justice tumbling company, the one and only Tulsa tumbling show where we your Jenks tumbling lessons Tulsa tumbling experts. And so the questions that we get from parents and athletes on a daily basis where your Jenks tumbling lessons hosts Coulton cruise and rusty breadth slur and we’re the owners of justice tumbling company in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I’m sorry for that dramatic intro.

Nobody to be alarmed, kill the little, little bit aggressive.

It will not kill you. Uh, but it is deadly and it will certainly kill your Jenks tumbling lessons tumbling and kill team morale. Oh my gosh. Yeah. Okay. So varsity Itis, it’s a, it’s a, it’s a term that we just coined here at justice tumbling company and we’re going to use it. Um, we seen some athletes coming in and out who have either a made the high school team, the Varsity team that they were looking for a looking to get onto or they’ve made their, uh, their all star team that they were dreaming about. Really

any team, that team that they want their kid resist, really excited about that. They were pushing so hard for that. They were so stressed out about that they were almost in tears on some practices and then they make that team. Lo and behold, they’ve made a, made it hard dresses off yes in the practice. Um, so varsity Idas I guess could be the term is as soon as that happens there are, believe it or not, some athletes that kind of just coast kickback

lose all motivation. They’re like, I’ve done it. Um, and that, and that’s all I have to do. Cause I’ve, I did everything I needed to make it and now I’m there and uh, and we’re good. That’s not the case.

No, it’s happening. And I think that happens subconsciously but also consciously, I think there’s athletes that that’s their goal. They want to do it in as soon as I do, they stopped doing privates. They stopped putting in the work. They mean to do that. I think there are, I had a sweet little girl, like her goal was to make this level 14, that’s the highest. And her gym, that’s what they could do. She wanted that team. She made that team. And then all these skills that we were like, nothing to her coming in. Now it’s just like she starts having all these mental, and I’m like, where did this come from? Like when it was working for that though, I was a nonissue, like, but now that we’ve made that team, now maybe there’s this pressure of, oh no, I’m expected to throw this skill all the time that subconsciously kids get in their heads. So it goes both ways.

Yeah. Yeah. So that’s one kind of Varsity itis. Does she still have a good attitude? How’s a great outlook? That one has a great attitude. The reason why we were making this podcast now is because there has been athlete in particular who always had the best, most positive, optimistic attitude. And I loved her for it. Still love her now. But, um, in classes, um, that attitude is completely gone. It’s like she had a drive and now, uh, she has that drive no more because she’s reached her goal. And, uh, it’s really, really sad to see that happen to that athlete because she was, she was definitely an Alpha

and yeah, it’s going to be interesting moving forward to dive in and see like what changed. But it’s funny cause Colton brought it up and I was like, that’s really funny that you said that because I had the same kind of the same response, like talking to her. So don’t be that athlete. We train our athletes are justice tumbling athletes to be those well-rounded like Alpha athletes that push themselves self-driven. Those are the athletes we want and that we want to kind of be our billboard. Um, so we don’t want these athletes who get this, like you said, deadly thing called varsity. I, yeah.

Yeah. And we’ve all heard of mumps, measles, the flu, this new thing. It’s, it’s a, it’s terrible. It’s absolutely terrible. Varsity itis. Um, just keep a positive, optimistic attitude. Keep, keep pushing for new goals. Even if you made, uh, the big goal, the big, the big dream of making varsity or, or making that team that you were so, uh, that was so sought after. There’s, you’re, you’re far from done with your, with your Jenks tumbling lessons career. Keep it going, keep making goals, keep setting goals and keep, keep reaching them.

You have to set goals. That’s how you stay motivated. That’s how you stay focused. And that’s why we have our goal wall. Some kids, that was their goal on their goal was to make a certain team. Once those kids came in and told us they made that, they raised it and put something new, right. Just because you made that goal doesn’t mean like, well cool, I’m done. Mission accomplished, time to retire.

Right? I, so here’s the thing with like, we can, we can kind of use it the same terminology in, in business. Some people can, can get, so, uh, can reach their goals and then get their bit, get their business, get it up and going and then just kind of settle. And, uh, that’s not our goal. We don’t want to settle, um, in our business. And we don’t want you guys to settle with your Jenks tumbling lessons goals, uh, especially if you’re like a sophomore or a freshman or w w I mean they’re seniors who get senior itis. We’ve all heard of that. Um, and even if, and we’ve done a podcast about it, even if you’re not looking at cheering in college still, why not better yourself while you’re here, while you’re, while you’re doing it now be the best that you can be. Um, same thing with itis.

If you’ve made that team, be the best on that team, be last past, be centered for jumps. Um, set those goals and then you have to worry about making the team next year because guess what? There’s going to be people moving up right up underneath you and they may have better skills than you. That’s not permanent. Just cause you made it one time doesn’t mean that you’re always going to, if you are that senior, like set a culture, like make it a culture to where you’re always training. You’re always trying to better. If you’re an all star team, that’s what it should be. It should be a culture in your Jenks tumbling lessons all star gym of trying to better always trying to push yourself and set goals and set that example and lead, lead the people underneath you that, uh, to, to that direction of setting goals and accomplishing them, especially seniors because seniors are looked up to and they’re like automatically given that seniority where they are in leadership positions and, and kind of taking charge.

So set that good example because if you’re able to do it now, then whenever you are in the workplace and you’re in the real world, um, and you have your Jenks tumbling lessons own job, then, then you’re going to be able to do it then and you’ll be successful at that. So all we want to success for you. We don’t want you to, same thing you know, in the real world, whenever you’re, uh, you get that dream job doesn’t mean that the fun is over a grind. It doesn’t, doesn’t mean that you don’t get to work anymore. You have to keep working to maintain yourself and maintain your position and keep that position. So are you saying Varsity Itis is curable? It’s so curable. Absolutely. It just is a, it requires a few, uh, prescriptions and doses of optimism and, uh, Alpha Ism and dedication, fearlessness and coachability. And we can get you there, um, and, uh, and, and just don’t lose sight of those goals will help you set goals if you’re like, listen, I’ve made varsity.

What else? What else now? Well, we’ll help you. We’ll get you there because there’s a lot, there’s a law and including checking us out on our website, which is justice tumbling, co.com listening to all of our podcasts. And uh, that’s, that’s step one. They’re free. Check it out. And then step two and three is follow our Jenks tumbling lessons on Facebook and Instagram ads, right? And then step four, we would love it if you left us an objective Google review to let us know how we’re doing. And then step five, we’ll see you next time on to tumble. Todd, with justice tumbling coming,

let me see you later.